The+Acquisition+of+Sign+Language+-+Lindsey+Charbonneau.ppt

The+Acquisition+of+Sign+Language+-+Lindsey+Charbonneau.ppt...

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Hoffmeister & Wilbur (1980) The Acquisition of Sign Language
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General Goal “Greater understanding of the impact of deafness on language development and the feasibility of using the visual channel as a pedagogical tool”
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General Facts About 10% of all deaf children have deaf parents *Deaf children with deaf parents have superior social and academic success *Deaf children with deaf parents are four times more likely to continue studies into college Deaf children of deaf parents have a parallel environment to hearing children of hearing parents Deaf children of hearing parents are a * At the time of this paper (1980)
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Summary of Available Studies of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents
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Summary of Available Studies of Deaf Children of Hearing Parents
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Notes Number of children studied is very small Total observation time is also very small Virtually no data for hearing children of deaf parents who learn both ASL and English
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Deaf Children of Deaf Parents
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Overview of Reported Data Children learning ASL pass through developmental stages similar to those reported for children learning spoken languages Data shows that deaf child’s first sign may emerge 2-3 months earlier than hearing child’s first word Some studies report vocabulary of 20 signs at 10 months, the age a hearing child will produce first word Two-sign utterances occur at 10 months & three-sign utterances at 18 months, while
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Some Caveats Comparisons of “first” sign to “first” word should be taken with caution because: 1. What may be intelligible to a parents may not be intelligible to an outside observer 2. The number of children studied to date is very small
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Side Note About Hearing Children With Deaf Parents In hearing children of deaf parents (who acquire English and ASL), the first sign may appear months before the first word Spoken vocabulary compliments signed vocabulary with small overlap Difference in vocabulary may reflect differential opportunities for usage of signs and speech
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Phonological Acquisition in Deaf Children with Deaf Parents
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Boyes-Braem Model Based on considerations of anatomy and motor development A is considered the unmarked handshape Other handshapes are described in terms of the addition of features (extended fingers, opposed thumb, contact with thumb)
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Modified Version (McIntire) Four stages of handshape development which are affected by opposition of the thumb, extension of one or more fingers, contact of a finger with the thumb Most relevant to acquisition of handshapes within single signs for simple lexical items Four Stages 1. Only one of the hands requires a finger to make contact with the thumb. Child can produce 5, S, L, A, G, C, and baby O 2. Child can produce B, F, adult O 3. Child can produce I, Y, D, P, 3, V, H, and W some of which include extension of the weaker fingers (ring finger and pinky) 4. Child can produce 8, 7, X, R, T, M, N, and E, some of which involve crossing fingers
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course LINGUISTIC 615:461 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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The+Acquisition+of+Sign+Language+-+Lindsey+Charbonneau.ppt...

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