230_013111 - Nucleus DNA Nucleotide Cell(a DNA double...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nucleus DNA Cell Nucleotide (a) DNA double helix (b) Single strand of DNA
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Discovery of the DNA Double Helix Rosalind’s X-ray photograph and determination of the sugar-phosphate backbone led Watson and Crick to propose the double helix model. 1920-1958
Background image of page 2
DNA RNA Protein he Central Dogma of Molecular Biolog Transcription Translation Phenotypic Attributes
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gene Expression Overview Step 1: DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA
Background image of page 4
Gene Expression Overview Step 2: Movement of the mRNA into the cytoplasm
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gene Expression Overview Step 3: Translation of the mRNA into a protein
Background image of page 6
Fig. 1-12 Outer membrane and cell surface Cytoplasm Nucleus Systems Analysis of the Cell
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cells Cells are the basic building blocks of organisms The cell is the simplest collection of matter that can live All organisms are made up of cells
Background image of page 8
Cells can be divided into two types Prokaryotic cells Eukaryotic cells EUKARYOTIC CELL Membrane Cytoplasm Organelles Nucleus (contains DNA) 1 µm PROKARYOTIC CELL DNA (no nucleus) Membrane igure 1.8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Three Domains (super kingdoms) for Classification of Living Organisms Bacteria Archaea Eukarya
Background image of page 10
Two general types: prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cells Prokaryotic Bacteria and Archae Extremeophiles Eukaryotic Protists, fungi, plants, animals
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Two general types: prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cells Prokaryotic Bacteria and Archae Extremeophiles Eukaryotic Protists, fungi, plants, animals
Background image of page 12
Two general types: prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cells Prokaryotic Bacteria and Archae Extremeophiles Eukaryotic Protists, fungi, plants, animals
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes are comprised of the same macromolecules Nucleic acids Polysaccharides Phospholipids Proteins
Background image of page 14
Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells More Common Features They are bounded by a plasma membrane They contain a semifluid substance called the cytosol They contain at least one chromosome (genetic material) They all have ribosomes, which assist with protein synthesis
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prokaryotic cells Lack many of the membrane-enclosed organelles found in eukaryotic cells They do not have a nucleus Their DNA is located in a region called the nucleoid Generally they are much smaller (1-5um) than eukaryotic cells (10-100um) Differences Between Procaryotes and Eucaryotes
Background image of page 16
Why do we care about prokaryotes? Consider this….
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course BIOL 230 taught by Professor J.breckler during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

Page1 / 44

230_013111 - Nucleus DNA Nucleotide Cell(a DNA double...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online