After Paul D reveals to Sethe that Halle witnessed her attack and smeared butter from the churn onto

After Paul D reveals to Sethe that Halle witnessed her attack and smeared butter from the churn onto

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After Paul D reveals to Sethe that Halle witnessed her attack and smeared butter from the churn  onto his face, Sethe interprets his act as a desperate response to his wife's bizarre deprivation of  breast milk. For Sethe, the scene fills a gap in the story of her flight; it explains, in part, why Halle  could not rescue her or reunite with his family. For Baby Suggs, Halle no longer exists, gone with her  other seven offspring. But he is replaced by her daughter-in-law and four grandchildren, whom she  welcomes with a sumptuous feast for 90, a food offering as rich as the butter that smeared Halle's  face when he realized his powerlessness to stop the assault on the barn floor beneath his hiding  place in the loft. These feedings symbolize a generosity denied by slavery, a hunger not soon to be  alleviated, even after nationwide emancipation.
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