Another figure of speech that Kingsolver often uses throughout The Bean Trees is allusion

Another figure of speech that Kingsolver often uses throughout The Bean Trees is allusion

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Unformatted text preview: Another figure of speech that Kingsolver often uses throughout The Bean Trees is allusion. She refers to historical or famous people, objects, and events to suggest more than what she is saying. Examples of Kingsolver's allusions include: Taylor's mother always told her that trading Foster, Taylor's father, for her "was the best deal this side of the Jackson Purchase." When Taylor was in high school, she had a new science teacher who "came high railing in there like some blond Paul McCartney." As Taylor and Turtle drive across the Arizona border, they see "clouds [that] were pink and fat and hilarious looking, like the hippo ballerinas in a Disney movie." Because Taylor is afraid that a tire will blow up whenever she goes to Jesus Is Lord Used Tires to check on her car, she "felt like John Wayne in that war movie where he buckles down his helmet, takes a swig of bourbon, and charges across the mine field yelling...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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