By the late 1840s

By the late 1840s - By the late 1840s, Melville, well...

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Unformatted text preview: By the late 1840s, Melville, well established as a notable author of travel romance and a contributor of comic pieces to Yankee Doodle magazine, became known as "the man who had lived among the cannibals." However, the reaction to his experimentation with satire, symbol, and allegory in Mardi (1849) gave him a hint of the fickleness of literary fame. Victorian readers turned away from his cynical philosophy and dark moods in favor of more uplifting authors. Lizzie, who lacked her husband's philosophical bent, confessed that the book was unclear to her. After the reading public's rejection, he voiced his dilemma: "What I feel most moved to write, that is banned, it will not pay. Yet, altogether, write the other way I cannot. So the product is a final hash, and all my books are botches." On an outing in the Berkshire Mountains, Melville made a major literary contact. He met and formed On an outing in the Berkshire Mountains, Melville made a major literary contact....
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