Chapter 20 begins with a description of the hospital and a description of Massachusetts

Chapter 20 begins with a description of the hospital and a description of Massachusetts

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 20 begins with a description of the hospital and a description of Massachusetts, "sunk in a marble calm." There has been a fresh blanket of snow, and everything looks deceptively clean. In a week, if Esther passes her interview, she will be released from the hospital and will be transported to college in Mrs. Guinea's large black car. Dr. Nolan has tried to be realistic and warn Esther that people may treat her oddly. Mrs. Greenwood has characteristically brushed off the institutionalization as merely "a bad dream." Plath writes, "To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is the bad dream." And in spite of all her treatments, Esther says that she remembers everything — cadavers, Doreen, the fig tree, Marco's diamond, the sailor, Doctor Gordon's wall-eyed nurse, the thermometers, "the Negro with his two kinds of beans," the extra...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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