{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Hrothgar quietly begins by praising Beowulf but quickly follows with a warning

Hrothgar quietly begins by praising Beowulf but quickly follows with a warning

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hrothgar quietly begins by praising Beowulf but quickly follows with a warning. If a leader is not  careful, God's gifts can lead him to vanity. The Danes' chief example of a gifted king gone wrong is  Heremod, who not only failed to treat his people generously but actually killed other Danes in his  own hall, a sin of unpardonable proportion in the world of the  comitatus,  the honor code binding a  ruler to his thanes.   Among other sins, Heremod indulged in  hubris,  an overwhelming pride or  arrogance that leads to outrageous behavior. He lived a joyless life and justifiably suffered for the  damage that he brought to his people. From that example, Hrothgar generalizes about all of those who benefit from God's gifts. Only the  wise and mature realize that all glory is fleeting. God will allow a "high-born heart [to] travel far in  delight" (1729); one day, however, it will fall. A fool grows in his arrogance and thinks he is invincible, 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}