In Morrison - In Morrison's own terms, the controlling...

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Unformatted text preview: In Morrison's own terms, the controlling theme of the novel is "how women negotiate or mediate between their nurturing compulsion to love the other, the thing that's bigger or better than they are in their lives — husband, children, work — and the other part, which is the individual separate self that has separate obligations." As Sethe confronts evil in herself and in the institution of slavery, motherhood itself rescues her from the oblivion of guilt, shame, and madness. Without the underloved ghost or the coddled, sheltered Denver, Sethe might have disintegrated from within, pulled apart by her "rememory." Instead, she takes refuge in love for her children, and she tentatively, excitedly acknowledges the ego that Paul D returns to nurture — "Me? Me?" The struggle to love in an inhuman system that breeds children like suckling pigs results in inhuman...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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