Morrison makes it clear that the victimization of former slaves does not stop with their escape from

Morrison makes it clear that the victimization of former slaves does not stop with their escape from

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Unformatted text preview: Morrison makes it clear that the victimization of former slaves does not stop with their escape from slave states. Law intervenes in Baby Suggs's life all the way to her burial. She enjoys only a four- week acquaintance with her daughter-in-law and grandchildren before schoolteacher, justified by the Fugitive Slave Law, terrifies Sethe into mayhem. Taking to her bed in search of respite from more worries than she can handle, Baby Suggs absorbs herself in the abstract comfort of color until her death. Sethe's order to "Take her to the Clearing," where she wants Baby Suggs buried, also meets opposition from laws that force mourners to bury the popular matriarch in the cemetery. The classical theme of hubris (exaggerated pride), an essential in Greek tragedy, delineates Sethe as the tragic heroine of this story. Because of her outrageous act of self-sufficiency, her neighbors as the tragic heroine of this story....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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