One of the first observations one might make about The Bell Jar is that it is a book filled with fea

One of the first observations one might make about The Bell Jar is that it is a book filled with fea

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Unformatted text preview: One of the first observations one might make about The Bell Jar is that it is a book filled with fears about death. Even the bell jar itself is a suffocating tomb, an airless place where the soul dies, if not the body. Consider the first page of the book with its reference to the execution of the Rosenbergs and the speaker's inability to get a cadaver's head out of her mind — all these images and ideas point to what is perhaps the main preoccupation in the book: death. When Esther wants Buddy Willard to show her "some really interesting hospital sights," this excursion includes a look at four cadavers and a number of glass bottles filled with dead babies. Esther is proud of how calm she is when observing these "gruesome things." She even nonchalantly leans her elbow on Buddy's cadaver while he dissects it. Later, watching a baby being born does not leans her elbow on Buddy's cadaver while he dissects it....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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