The door to Heorot bursts open at the ogre

The door to Heorot bursts open at the ogre - The door to...

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Unformatted text preview: The door to Heorot bursts open at the ogre's touch, implying Grendel's great strength. His heart laughs, an effective metaphor, at the sight of the sleeping Geats. Grendel's entrance into Heorot anticipates his brutality. He doesn't just knock down the door; he "rip[s] open / the mouth of the hall" (72324). In a device often used by the poet, this image anticipates the next major action: Grendel's ripping apart of the Geat warrior, Hondscio (740 ff.). Grendel quickly guts the man while the warrior still sleeps. Blood swills from veins ripped open by the ogre's mouth, and the warrior is quickly devoured. With an appreciation for gruesome detail, the poet reveals that Grendel even gulps down "fet ond folma" (745), the feet and hands of the Geat. Meanwhile, Beowulf watches, learning the likely approach of his adversary. Some critics complain Meanwhile, Beowulf watches, learning the likely approach of his adversary....
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