The inclusion of the story of Finnsburh is interesting partly because it gives us an idea of how a s

The inclusion of the story of Finnsburh is interesting partly because it gives us an idea of how a s

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Unformatted text preview: The inclusion of the story of Finnsburh is interesting partly because it gives us an idea of how a story like the Beowulf epic might have been presented. Although a modern audience might think that the Beowulf poet is interrupting the story, the scop 's performance, or something like it, probably would have taken place. Our only knowledge of the Finnsburh episode comes from two sources: Beowulf (lines 1068–1159 of the epic) and The Finnsburh Fragment , a short (47 lines) heroic ballad by another poet. The latter consists of an account of a single battle that supposedly took place in the Danes' past but recently enough to stir passions and reflect on current feuds. Critics differ on motivation of the major characters; but, considering both sources, we can make a fair assessment of the action and how it fits in Beowulf....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 1320 taught by Professor Bost during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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The inclusion of the story of Finnsburh is interesting partly because it gives us an idea of how a s

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