M313Lec08

M313Lec08 - Math 313 Lecture #8 1.6: Partitioned Matrices...

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Unformatted text preview: Math 313 Lecture #8 1.6: Partitioned Matrices Matrix Multiplication Again. Recall that the ( i, j ) entry of the product AB for an m n matrix A = ( a ij ) and a n r matrix B = ( b ij ) is the scalar product (or inner product ) of the i th row of A and the j th column of B : n X k =1 a ik b kj = ~a ( i, :) ~ b j . Inherit in this is the partition of A into rows and B into columns. Recall also that each column of AB is the product of A with the corresponding column of B : AB = ( A ~ b 1 , . . . , A ~ b r ) . This results from another partition of A and B into blocks or submatrices : in this case, A is left unpartitioned (i.e., taken as itself), and B is partitioned into columns. Another partition of A and B gives a representation of AB in terms of its rows: AB = ~a (1 , :) B ~a (2 , :) B . . . ~a ( m, :) B . Example. Let A = 2 2 1 3- 1 0 and B = 3 1- 1- 2 1 . Then the columns of AB are A ~ b 1 = 2 2 1 3- 1 0 3- 1 = 4 10 , A ~ b 2 = 2 2 1 3- 1 0 1- 2 1 = 1 5 , while the rows of AB are ~a (1 , :) B = 2 2 1 3 1- 1- 2 1 = 4 1 , ~a (2 , :) B = 3- 1 0 3 1- 1- 2 1 = 10 5 ....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course MATH 313 taught by Professor Na during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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M313Lec08 - Math 313 Lecture #8 1.6: Partitioned Matrices...

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