Both the social criticism and the comic elements are typical of Dickens

Both the social criticism and the comic elements are typical of Dickens

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Unformatted text preview: Both the social criticism and the comic elements are typical of Dickens' novels. Typical also are several other features of Bleak House. As in almost all of Dickens' fiction, the main setting is the city. It is the city, not the country, that brings his imagination to its richest life, and, of course, it is in the city that the worst and the greatest number of social problems are manifested. As usual, too, there are many characters. Several are vivid they "come alive" to our imagination. Most of the characters are distinctly "good" or "bad" rather than in-between. Few, if any, undergo a significant change (development). And, as is often the case, there is one character who is so benevolent (and well off) that he is able to reward the deserving and bring events to a conclusion that is at least typical of Dickens and of Victorian...
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