Dickens was a socially conscious Whig but could not be called a political activist

Dickens was a socially conscious Whig but could not be called a political activist

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Unformatted text preview: Dickens was a socially conscious Whig but could not be called a political activist. He was genuinely sympathetic to the working class and highly critical of both the idle among the nobility and the newly rich class that was created by industrialization. For the most part, however, his efforts on behalf of social reform were limited to charitable donations and benefit readings and to the social message implied in works of fiction, whose primary aim was to provide pleasure for the imagination. In his later years, Dickens became less optimistic about social improvement and dropped his criticism of the aristocracy; in 1865-1866, he defected from the liberals and supported a conservative cause backed by Tennyson, Freud, and Carlyle. Even in his earlier years, he was devoted to Queen Victoria and to British institutions and customs in general. He was an opponent of revolution and even of the right of British institutions and customs in general....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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