In other words

In other words - In other words, Dickens was not forced to...

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Unformatted text preview: In other words, Dickens was not forced to use only a very limited vocabulary or to forego subtleties of tone and emphasis; nor did he feel obliged to keep all his sentences short and simply constructed when emotion or the complexity of an idea cried out for longer or more complicated ones. He also knew that his readers were responsive to playfulness in words and hence would not insist that he keep coming bluntly to the point and "get on with things"; and so he was free to play one of his favorite roles: the entertainer here a verbal entertainer, as elsewhere a mimic or theatrical entertainer (Dickens was an active public reader, actor, and practical joker as well as an author). In Bleak House, Dickens turns a "classical allusion" into a joke but only because his readers, far more literate than today's readers, would recognize the allusion and therefore appreciate the twist.more literate than today's readers, would recognize the allusion and therefore appreciate the twist....
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