Melville attempted to support not only his own family but also his mother and sisters

Melville attempted to support not only his own family but also his mother and sisters

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Melville attempted to support not only his own family but also his mother and sisters, who moved in  with the Melvilles ostensibly to teach Lizzie how to keep house. In a letter to Hawthorne, Melville  complains, "Dollars damn me." He owed  Harper's  for advances on his work. The financial strain, plus  immobilizing attacks of rheumatism in his back, failing eyesight, sciatica, and the psychological  stress of writing  Moby-Dick,  led to a nervous breakdown in 1856. The experience with  Mardi  had  proved prophetic.  Moby-Dick ,  now considered his major work and a milestone in American literature,  suffered severe critical disfavor. He followed with  Pierre  (1852),  Israel Potter  (1855),  The Piazza  Tales  (1856), and  The Confidence Man  (1857), but never regained the readership he had enjoyed  with his first four novels. Shunned by readers as uncouth, formless, irrelevant, verbose, and emotional, 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

Page1 / 2

Melville attempted to support not only his own family but also his mother and sisters

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online