Most autobiographical writing has two points of view

Most autobiographical writing has two points of view - Most...

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Unformatted text preview: Most autobiographical writing has two points of view: that of the writer as he was then and that of the writer as he exists in the present. Consequently many of the conclusions which Wright draws from his early behavior are seen only in retrospect; at the time about which he is writing he was unaware of many factors. Looking back, even seemingly blind actions have a significant motive. The writer learns who he was, and is, by writing. As we follow, step by step, the evolution of Richard Wright's personality, we must believe him more than we believe the narrator of a work of fiction. The objective quality of Wright's voice throughout Black Boy gives the tale an authority it might otherwise lack. When he arrives in Memphis in 1925, Richard is on his own for the first time in his life. He is separated from his family, not only by miles but by money. He has no choice but to succeed. Yet, in separated from his family, not only by miles but by money....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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