The first chapter of the book establishes its theme and conflicts

The first chapter of the book establishes its theme and conflicts

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Unformatted text preview: The first chapter of the book establishes its theme and conflicts. It is not necessary to search for symbolic meanings. Each incident describes, in close detail, the emotions of the narrator. It is enough to be sensitive to his emotions and to the situations from which they spring. Since he is just a small child when these events occur, he is unconscious of their effect on his later manhood. However, the voice of the author no matter how objective provides order to what is otherwise chaos. In the very first words of the book, Richard Wright establishes his distance from the four-year-old boy who sits in his grandmother's house in Mississippi. His grandmother is sick, and he has been warned several times by his mother to keep quiet; however, his rebellious personality is immediately revealed in the dramatic gesture of setting the house on fire. The reader then is immediately conscious of the in the dramatic gesture of setting the house on fire....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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