Though Dickens deplored injustice and needless suffering and satirized

Though Dickens deplored injustice and needless suffering and satirized

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Though Dickens deplored injustice and needless suffering and satirized, sometimes bitterly, anyone  or anything that perpetrated them, he was by nature too much in love with life, too fun-loving and  spontaneous, to be (or even to pose as) morally grave or cautionary or ethically obsessed. Like  Shakespeare and Mozart, he personifies prolific creativity, and his first impulse is to celebrate. He  probably could not have brought himself to stay with the theme of social reform if he hadn't been able  to do so creatively — through exciting incidents and vivid characters that were fun to create, and  through mocking tones, wry or hilarious cracks. One way he got around his evangelicized readers'  desire for fictional characters who were paragons of virtue (and who, being so, are likely to be  artistically uninteresting) was to concentrate, much of the time, on 
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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