Worth noting is the fact that characters in fiction do not actually have to be lifelike

Worth noting is the fact that characters in fiction do not actually have to be lifelike

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Worth noting is the fact that characters in fiction do not actually have to be lifelike, in the sense of  being complex and highly individualized, in order to be successful and memorable. Talking animals  aren't at all lifelike, yet more than a few have achieved status as compelling characters. The Fool in  King Lear  has relatively few lines, some of them rather obscure, yet few minor characters have  become more memorable. Claggart, the villain in  Billy Budd,  is barely characterized at all, but he  haunts us. What adds a character to the permanent repertoire of our minds is not dependent on  "realism" or even on complete credibility, but solely on the magic vitality that an author is able to  endow from the depths and riches of spontaneous creativity. Dickens possessed both the vitality and  the skill to find the words that conveyed it. Dickens is very much a satirist and a comic entertainer, and very little of a depth-hunting  "psychologist" with literary talent. Twentieth-century "psychological" novelists (for example, Virginia 
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Worth noting is the fact that characters in fiction do not actually have to be lifelike

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