Honey bee feeding

Honey bee feeding - pollen press compacts the pollen pollen pushed in between the two rows of bristles to form pollen sac Bees hind leg A bee

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Honey bee feeding The honeybee feeds on nectar and pollen, both of which are collected from flowers Head of honey bee The nectar is sucked from the nectaries in flowers by means of a proboscis. The proboscis is tucked back under the thorax when not in use tube through which nectar is drawn jaws; they manipulate the wax in making the cells and cut the capping off the cells compound eye antenna mouthparts which fit together to form a tube Structure of the proboscis Nectar Pollen When a bee visits a flower, its body becomes dusted with pollen. The hind legs are adapted to comb the pollen off the body, compact it and store it as ‘pollen sacs’. These are pushed into cells in the hive when the bee returns. pollen comb collects pollen from body
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Unformatted text preview: pollen press compacts the pollen pollen pushed in between the two rows of bristles to form pollen sac Bees hind leg A bee returning to the hive from a good source of nectar performs a dance on the vertical comb. The dance follows a track like a squashed figure 8. The angle between the central line and the vertical represents the angle between the source, the hive and the sun. The degree of waggle in this line indicates the distance; more waggle means greater distance. Other workers, in the darkness of the hive follow the dancing bee and so learn the direction and distance of the nectar source hive *angle nectar source sun *same angle vertical The waggle-tail dance D.G. Mackean...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO 218 taught by Professor Young during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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