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5) Electrochemical Measurement and Batteries (1)

5) Electrochemical Measurement and Batteries (1) -...

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INTRODUCTION In this experiment, we constructed an activity series of metals, such as silver, copper, iron, zinc and determined which metals to use in constructing battery with highest voltage. Even though metals have a strong tendency to give up electrons and form positive ions, the strength varies from metal to metal. The ranking of the strength is called the activity series for metals. We determined the strength by measuring the potential difference between various half reactions. To do this, we compared electrochemical potential differences in galvanic cells made of different pairs of metal/metal ions. Purpose: To examine galvanic cells and electrolytic cells -how galvanic cells work & how they are used -construct own battery & electrode -construct an electrolytic cell Background: a) ΔE>0 → spontaneous ΔE<0 → non-spontaneous b) Nernst Equation E cell = ∆ E ° cell – (0.05916/n) log Q (T=298 K) PROCEDURE Part II: construction of an activity series of metals 1) set up half-cells (fig. 1-1) 2) clean metal using sand paper 3) connect the alligator clips 4) record the V & label which is the cathode 5) disconnect clips, clean, and record the second measurement 6) repeat for all possible pairings Part III: plan and construction of a battery 1) measure its voltage when cell’s finished 2) record drawing of your cell 3) label the components used & the ∆ E cell 4) when finished, connect the cell to a single voltmeter 5) record a drawing & total ∆ E cell 6) test if it generates enough energy to light a bulb DATA Part II Cathode Anode Trial 1 (V) Trial 2 (V) Average (V)
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Ag Zn .420 .480 .450 Ag Fe .945 .947 .946 Ag Cu .324 .325 .3245 Zn Fe .493 .503 .498
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