кабохейдр

кабохейдр

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Carbohydrates (sugars) - the general name of a broad class of natural organic compounds. The name comes from the word "coal" and "water". The reason for this is that the first known science carbohydrates described molecular formula C x (H 2 O) y, formally as compounds of carbon and water. In terms of chemistry carbohydrates are organic substances containing unramified chain of several atoms of carbon, carbonyl group, as well as several hydroxyl groups. Simple and complex carbohydrates As the capacity for hydrolysis of monomers of carbohydrates are divided into two groups: simple (monosaccharides) and complex (oligosaccharides and polysaccharides). Complex carbohydrates, as opposed to simple, able to hydrolyse with formation of simple carbohydrates, monomers. Simple carbohydrates are easily soluble in water and are synthesized in green plants. The biological role and biosynthesis of carbohydrates The biological significance of carbohydrates: 1. Carbohydrates perform cosmetic function, that is involved in the construction of bones, cells, enzymes. They constitute 2-3% of the weight. 2. Carbohydrates are the primary energy material. The oxidation of 1 gram of carbohydrates allocated 4.1 kcal of energy and 0.4 g of water. 3. In the blood contains 100-110 mg /% glucose. From the concentration of glucose depends on the osmotic pressure of blood. 4. Pentose (ribose and deoxyribose) are involved in the construction of ATP, DNA and RNA. 5.
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course RWR fref taught by Professor Erf during the Spring '11 term at Audencia Nantes Ecole de Management.

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кабохейдр

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