Ecohydrology_Lecture6_F11

Ecohydrology_Lecture6_F11 - Patterned Landscapes...

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Patterned Landscapes Ecohydrolog y Fall 2011
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Scale Dependent Feedbacks Local positive feedbacks catalyze dispersal over short distances Inhibition occurs over longer range Autocorrelation as an indicator Rietkerk and van de Koppel (2008) TREE
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Diagnostic Properties of Patterned Landscapes Evidence of bi- stability Evidence of scale dependent feedbacks Rietkerk and van de Koppel (2008) TREE Eppinga et al. (2008) Ecosystems
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Persistence and Loss of Pattern in the Everglades
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What Drives Local Variation in “States”? Watts et al. (2010)
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Predictions Bi-modal distribution of soil elevation Scale-dependent auto-correlation Anisotropic because the landscape is patterned in the direction of flow Changes with hydrologic modification
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Bi-Modality is a Keystone Feature of the Best Conserved Parts of the Landscape (and the loss of this feature PRECEDES changes in vegetation!) Bimodal (cm) A-priori (cm) Stabilized Flow 0 6.7 Drained 0 4.2 Conserved 1 17.4 14.1 Conserved 2 20.2 19.1 Transition 1 24.7 24.1 Transition 2 26.1 12.2 Impounded 0 13.9 ENP 16.9 14.2
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Scale-Dependent Feedbacks are Present, Anisotropic, and can Degrade
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Topography Affects Flow Self-organizing canal hypothesis: The prevalence and orientation of ridges and sloughs are controlled the capacity of the landscape the route flow. Ridges (because they are higher) impede flow, making sloughs the conduits to route water off the landscape As ridge increase, they impacts flow anisotropically
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