Ecohydrology_Lecture9_F11

Ecohydrology_Lecture9_F11 - Stream Nutrient Processing...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stream Nutrient Processing: Spiraling, Removal and Lotic Eutrophication Ecohydrology Fall 2011
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nutrient Cycles Global recycling of elemental requirements Major elements (C, H, N, O, P, S) Micro nutrients (Ca, Fe, Co, B, Mg, Mn, Cu, K, Z, Na,…) These planetary element cycles are: Exert massive control on ecological organization In turn are controlled in their rate, mode, timing and location by ecological process Are highly coupled to the planets water cycle
Image of page 2
Global Ratios of Supply and Demand – Aquatic Ecosystems
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Inducing Eutrophication Leibig’s Law of the Minimum Some element ( or light or water) limits primary production (GPP) Adding that thing will increase yields to a point ; effects saturate when something else limits What limits productivity in forests? Crops? Lakes? Pelagic ocean? Justus von Liebig (GPP)
Image of page 4
Phosphorus Cycle Global phosphorus cycle does not include the atmosphere (no gaseous phase). Largest quantities found in mineral deposits and marine sediments. Much in forms not directly available to plants. Slowly released in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems via weathering (and, not slowly, by mining). Numerous abiotic interactions Sorption, co-precipitation in many minerals
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Phosphorus Cycle http://arnica.csustan.edu/carosella/Biol4050W03/figures/phosphorus_cycle.htm
Image of page 6
Nitrogen Cycle Includes major atmospheric pool - N2. N fixers use atmospheric supply directly (prokaryotes). Energy-demanding process; reduces to N2 to ammonia (NH3). Industrial N2- fixation for fertilizers exceeds biological N fixation annually. (We do it with Haber-Bosch ) Denitrifying bacteria release N2 in anaerobic respiration (they “breathe” nitrate). Decomposer and consumers release waste N in form of urea or ammonia.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
Global Nitrogen Enrichment Humans have massively amplified global N cycle Terrestrial Inputs 1890: ~ 150 Tg N yr- 1 2005: ~ 290+ Tg N yr-1 River Outputs 1890: ~ 30 Tg N yr-1 2005: ~ 60+ Tg N yr-1 N frequently limits terrestrial and aquatic primary Gruber and Galloway 2008
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Watershed N Losses Applied N loads >> River Exports Slope = 0.25 Losses to assimilation (storage) and denitrification Variable in time and space Variable with river Boyer et al. 2006 Van Breeman et al. 2002
Image of page 10
Rivers are not chutes (Rivers are the chutes down which slide the ruin of continents) Internal processes dramatically attenuate load Assimilation to create particulate N Denitrification – a permanent sink Understanding the internal processing is important Local effects of enrichment (i.e., eutrophication) Downstream protection (i.e., autopurification) Understanding nutrient processing (across
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nutrient Cycling in Streams Advection it commanding organization process in streams and rivers – FLOW MATTERS Nutrients in streams are subject to downstream transport.
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern