Ch6ZeusHera - Classics 10 Chapter 6 Fall 2011 Myths of the...

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Classics 10: Chapter 6: Fall 2011 Myths of the Olympians I: Zeus, Hera, Poseidon [First Exam Next Fri.] I. The Twelve Olympians II. Zeus, Lord of the Sky III. Hera, Queen of Heaven IV. Poseidon, Lord of the Deep Bronze statue of Zeus (or Poseidon), slightly larger than life size, 470-450 BCE
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Reserve Copy A copy of our textbook (I’ve finally obtained another copy) will be in Shields Library Reserves (a 2 hour reserve) this afternoon. Sorry that took so long.
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First Exam: Friday, Oct.14 70 Multiple Choice Questions in 50 minutes (33% of final grade) Bring UCD 2000 Scantron Form and #2 pencil; arrive early if possible Blue scantron, smaller than sheet of paper 3 or 4 different versions of exam, but at same level of difficulty Any suspected cheating will be submitted to Student Judicial Affairs for arbitration
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Priorities for Studying 1. Lecture Power Points: all names, terms, concepts, periods (except the visual art) Primary source for exam questions = the things I particularly emphasize in lecture 1. Key Names and Terms listed at the end of each chapter in the textbook 15 Sample Exam Questions Posted to SmartSite; 3 examples to follow here
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The Race of the Hellenes Deucalion / Pyrrha Hellen "Hellenes" Dorus "Dorians" Aeolus "Aeolians" Xuthus Ion "Ionians" Most important of their “children” were the eponymous heroes of the Greeks (eponymous= “giving one’s name to something”)
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Sample Exam Questions 1. Which of the following was a descendant of Deucalion? A) Eponymous B) Prometheus C) Aeolus D) Iapetus E) None 2. Which of the following was NOT a descendant of Deucalion? A) Ion B) Dorus C) Hellen D) Pyrrha E) None
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Sample Exam Questions 3. Prometheus tried to trick Zeus by offering him ox bones wrapped in fat, just as humans burned the bones of an animal as a sacrifice to the gods. This myth is an example of: (a) succession myth (b) creation myth (c) etiological myth (d) eponymous myth
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Some Additional Accounts of the Creation of Mankind Symposium of Plato Protagoras of Plato
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Plato’s Comical Myth of Human Origins and Need for Sex From Plato’s dialogue about love, the Symposium , spoken by Aristophanes (the greatest Greek comic playwright) Humans once circular blobs, two heads, four hands, four feet, two sets of genitals cartwheeling their way into challenging gods Zeus cuts them in half as punishment; turned heads to cut side; belly button is where our halves sown up
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Plato on True Love Once split, each spends rest of life searching for “other half”, “soul mate” Only one person is truly the one. If found, constant embrace until starvation Zeus thus turns genitals around so satisfaction of desire can be had, previously deposited seed into ground, like cicadas Explains both heterosexual and homosexual desire I.e., some of us were man-woman, some man-
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Protagoras’ Myth of Human Origins from Plato’s Protagoras 320c-323a Once upon a time, there were gods, but no mortal creatures. Gods formed them in the earth out of earth and fire.
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