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Ch7MaleOlympians+post

Ch7MaleOlympians+post - Classics 10 Chapter 7 Fall 2011...

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Classics 10: Chapter 7: Fall 2011 Myths of the Olympians II: The Male Deities I. Poseidon, Lord of the Deep II. Apollo the Far-Darter, God of Prophecy III. Hephaestus, God of Smiths IV. Ares, Incarnation of Blood Lust V. Hermes, Trickster God of Wayfarers FIRST EXAM ON FRIDAY
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First Exam: Friday, 14 October 70 Multiple Choice Questions in 50 minutes (33% of final grade) Bring UCD 2000 Scantron Form and #2 pencil; arrive early if possible Blue scantron, smaller than sheet of paper 3 to 4 different versions of exam, but all of the same level of difficulty Any suspected cheating will be submitted to Student Judicial Affairs for arbitration Sample Test (15 Questions) on SmartSite
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Chapter 7: Male Deities Greek male deities reflect the range of activities consistent with the roles Greek men played in their society Model of positive qualities: good looks, courage, appropriate action Yet they also get drunk, lust, fight They control men yet they are the reflection of men
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Exclusively Male Roles (and their divine overseer) Heads of families (Zeus) Purveyors of higher knowledge (Apollo) Sailors (Poseidon) Blacksmiths (Hephaestus) Soldiers (Ares) Bankers, merchants (Hermes)
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I. Poseidon, Lord of the Deep Once an Indo-European male fertility god? Would explain the tangle of his competencies: original: springs, horses, earthquakes acquired: saltwater (Mediterranean) sea “Shaker of the Earth”; master of terrifying movement; dangerous, unpredictable god Married to Amphitrite father of the merman Triton, who blows his conch shell to calm the sea
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Poseidon, Lord of the Deep Greeks distrustful of the sea But their food and commerce depended on it Hesiod in W&D (678) says... Men are tossed in their boats; Poseidon drives his chariot across the waves Also the god of horses, remember Poseidon controls storms, tsunamis Depicted very similarly to his brother Zeus, but with a trident not a lightning bolt
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Poseidon with his Trident Poseidon or Zeus?
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Poseidon with Trident on Hippokampos, Archaic Age
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Poseidon’s temple at Sounion, 5 th cent. BCE
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Byron’s signature at Sounion
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[Hades, King of the Dead] Not an Olympian, covered in Chapter 11 Name means “the invisible” Embodiment of the unseen dead; ghosts “Pluto” (wealth) (the enricher) Wealth of the dead enriches the earth (?) Euphemistic name Has invisibility helmet given by Cyclopes Pitiless, feared more than respected Husband to Persephone
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Hades and Persephone, Late Classical/Early Hellenistic
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Hades et al.
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II. Apollo the Far-Darter,
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