Ch8FemaleOlympians

Ch8FemaleOlympians - Classics 10: Chapter 8: Fall 2011...

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Classics 10: Chapter 8: Fall 2011 Myths of the Olympians III: The Female Deities [Hermes continued] I. Demeter, Goddess of Wheat II. Hestia, Goddess of the Hearth III. Aphrodite, Goddess of Sexual Love IV. Artemis, Goddess of Animals V. Athena, Goddess of the City FIRST EXAM THIS FRIDAY At left, The Birth of Venus [Aphrodite], Sandro Botticelli, 1482
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V. Hermes, Trickster God of Wayfarers Son of Zeus and Maia, irreverent even as a baby Name = “he of the stone heap” From the stone cairns used to mark trails Protector of travelers (hence also thieves, merchants, shepherds, heralds, tricksters, etc.) Guides souls to the Underworld (“ psychopompos ”); also primary messenger of the Olympians Symbols: traveler’s hat, winged sandals Caduceus: two snakes intertwined, the emblem of the herald/messenger (given by the healer Apollo?)
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Hermes Psychopompos, Death of Sarpedon, late 6 th cent. BCE
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The Herms of Hermes Stone pile becomes a column with human (or Hermes’) head, called a Herm, ( Hermokopidae ) Used as milestones or to mark boundaries, in front of homes Erect phallus to ward off aggression Powell suggests we compare “flipping the
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The Homeric Hymn to Hermes 6th Century BCE, celebrates Hermes’ trickery, even as a baby two days old (!) He invents his sandals and the lyre He steals Apollo’s cattle, eventually offers recompense by giving him the lyre Does not hide that Hermes is a brilliant liar, yet sympathetic to his creativity
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Hermes Slaying Argos Panoptes, 5 th cent. BCE
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Hermes in Magic (Attica, 4 th cent. BCE, to do with an upcoming court case) Side A Hermes of the underworld and Hekate of the underworld Side B Let Pherenikos be bound before Hermes of the underworld and Hekate of the underworld. I bind Pherenikos’ girl Galene to Hermes of the underworld and to Hekate of the underworld I bind her. And just as this lead is worthless and cold, so let that man and his property be worthless and cold. ..Also bind Pherenikos’ soul and mind and tongue and plans and the things that he is doing and the things that he is planning concerning me. May everything be contrary for him. ..
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Two Sons of Hermes Autolycus Master thief; could make himself invisible Grandfather of Odysseus Pan, the Goatherd’s God Has hoofs and legs of a goat, tail, horns Ugly, lecherous (our sense of “horny”?) Name related to feeding, helps fatten the goats Roamed the wild hills of Arcadia away from the sea Plays reed pipe, the “Pipes of Pan” (Syrinx) His cry induces “panic” in the solitude of the woods
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th cent. BCE
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2011 for the course CLA 10 taught by Professor Traill during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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Ch8FemaleOlympians - Classics 10: Chapter 8: Fall 2011...

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