Ch16Crete

Ch16Crete - Classics 10 Chapter 16 Fall 2011 The Myths of Crete[Theseus I Crete History from Archaeology II Cretan Myth Bulls and the Minotaur

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Classics 10: Chapter 16: Fall 2011 The Myths of Crete [Theseus] I. Crete: History from Archaeology II. Cretan Myth: Bulls and the Minotaur
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Second Midterm Exam Scores should be posted by Wednesday p.m. to the gradebook on MyUCDavis course website I welcome comments on the exam via email: [email protected] Was the exam fair? As described? Contact Nathan Hill if you wish to receive a copy of your exam (please notify him at least the day before you wish to pick it up —he doesn’t carry the exams around with him): [email protected]
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Theseus Goes to Crete Theseus goes to Crete to kill the Minotaur and release Athens from the control of King Minos on Crete Had promised his father that if successful he would change his sail for his return trip from black to white Kills the Minotaur but forgets to change the sail Aegeus sees the black sail in the distance, throws himself in the sea Now called the Aegean Sea in his honor
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Theseus, King of Athens Theseus thus returns to tragedy but inherits the kingship Reorganizes region of Attica under Athens Founds the Panathenaic Festival, which celebrates the unity of Attica under Athens These previous two mostly done by Pisistratus Founds the popular assembly for political participation by the people (or Cleisthenes?) But did he really do these things historically? Later figures likely attribute their deeds to Theseus They may have “finished” what he started; popular to attribute one’s reforms to Theseus’ original plans
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Theseus (brief review) Theseus a minor figure in earliest Greek myth; yet THE major hero of Athens by 450 BCE Expansion and popularization of his myth begins with the tyrant Pisistratus (561-527) Uses Theseus as model for his own deeds for the city When Cleisthenes created Athenian democracy in 508 BCE, he claimed to be inspired by Theseus’ creation of the assembly After the Persian War, Athenian victory was conveyed through comparisons with the Amazonomachy and Centauromachy Also his killing of the monstrous Minotaur
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The Politics of Myth Theseus’ bones are brought to Athens in 5th Century; a Festival of Theseus created Athens came to champion Theseus when Sparta was championing Heracles Compare their respective Labors Hence Athens turned Theseus into a bigger hero than he seems to have been The process of mythmaking almost visible under these political conditions Yet is propaganda really myth? Doesn’t propaganda have a different collective importance? Or should it not surprise that myth can be partisan? Rome will turn the Greek myths to Rome’s benefit
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Myths of Crete Cretan myths = Greek myths, told by Greeks about Crete, NOT told by Cretans Greeks perhaps emphasizing the evil and the bizarre in what they found on Crete Stereotype: Cretans = lusty rogues and liars Cretan society known through archaeology Cretan myth reflects known archaeology Clear connection between Crete and Athens, to the advantage of Athens
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Crete as Aegean Crossroads
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Crete as Crossroads Crete = intersection of trading routes between Greece and Egypt; Greece and Middle East
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2011 for the course CLA 10 taught by Professor Traill during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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Ch16Crete - Classics 10 Chapter 16 Fall 2011 The Myths of Crete[Theseus I Crete History from Archaeology II Cretan Myth Bulls and the Minotaur

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