Resonance (1) - Guide to Drawing Resonance Structures 1. Do...

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Guide to Drawing Resonance Structures 1. Do not violate the octet rule!!! (DO NOT HAVE 5 BONDS TO CARBON!!!) 2. The overall charge of a molecule should not change—atoms may have charges, but the net charge of the entire molecule should not change. 3. Place resonance structures inside brackets ([ ]) and use to separate each structure 4. Do not break σ bonds! (e.g. do not break C-C, C-H, C-O, or C-N single bonds) 5. Carbon can have 6 or 8 electrons. Nitrogen will sometimes have 6 electrons, but this is very rare (e.g. in the minor resonance structure of the nitrosyl cation, NO + , nitrogen has six electrons). In general, however, nitrogen should have eight electrons around it. O, F, Cl, Br, and I must always have 8 electrons. Structures with a maximum number of octets are preferred . 6. Charges will be preferentially located on atoms of compatible electronegativity. For example, oxygen is more electronegative than carbon; therefore, a negative charge will preferentially be placed on oxygen rather than carbon in the dominant resonance
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2011 for the course CHEM118A 118A taught by Professor Tantillo during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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Resonance (1) - Guide to Drawing Resonance Structures 1. Do...

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