IAFS PAPER 1_ LIBERAL INTERNATIONAL ORDER.pdf - Sydney...

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Sydney Halperin IAFS 1000 PAPER ONE As nationalism and populist sentiment has risen across the globe many international affairs scholars have asked the question: is the international liberal order, which has guided the international system since the end of World War II dead? During a Monk debate in Toronto in April of 2017 two well known international affairs commentators, Niall Ferguson and Fareed Zakaria, gathered to debate this question. Ferguson argued that the international liberal order that governed the globe for the past 70 years is indeed dead, in part due to the rise of nationalism and demagoguery. Zakaria, on the other hand, argued that the international liberal order is in fact not dead, but has indeed faced its fair share of challenges. In this paper I will seek to supply my own interpretation as to if the liberal international order is indeed dead. First and foremost I will begin by explaining what the international liberal order is and it’s goals. The liberal international order is the idea of nation-states working together to achieve security and prosperity (Deudney, 16). This order is organized around economic openness, international institutions, cooperation, solidarity and internationalist ideals (Ikenberry, 2). All of this aimed at the goal of a more peaceful and prosperous world. The idea of liberalism has survived through many tumultuous world events because of its core values and capacity to effectively tackle the problems of modernity and globalization. It has done so because of interdependence. As long as nation-states are intertwined in this way people and governments everywhere will be pushed to work together to solve problems, which inturn builds on and reinforces the institutions of liberal order (Deudney, 16). While the global political system has

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