Welcome Skepticism Fall Aug 29 2011

Welcome Skepticism Fall Aug 29 2011 - Welcome to Biology...

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Welcome to Biology 100 -- Sections 13-21 (10:00, 455 MARB) Sections 22-30 (12:00, 455 MARB) Rex Cates and Stephanie Burdett REFER TO SYLLABUS and COURSE SCHEDULE: 1. Your TA is listed on the front page 2. READ THEM! Stephanie Burdett, Course Manager (109 HRCB) Biology 100 Assistants (109 HRCB)
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Learning outcomes (see Syllabus) 1. Students will understand and be able to explain basic biological concepts and content. 2. Students will be able to apply sound reasoning using biological literacy to evaluate scientific claims/evidence and other claims. 3. Students will respect divergent opinions and intelligently converse about current society-related scientific issues in biology. 4. Students will learn to find reliable sources of information, evaluate information, and effectively communicate arguments using reliable evidence.
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Course Objective to Address Learning Outcomes Course is designed to help students become “responsible skeptics” resulting in their being more prudent stewards in their home, community, and nation. What is a “responsible skeptic”? What does it mean to be prudent? What is a steward? Why is our course organized around the above learning outcomes and objective? 1. Biological issues permeate every facet of our lives. 2. To help us become more informed, sound-reasoning citizens
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% of Employers who want Colleges to Place Emphasis on Essential Learning Outcomes Intellectual and Practical Skills Written and oral communication 89% Critical thinking and analytical reasoning 81% Complex problem solving 75% Teamwork skills in diverse groups 71% Creativity and innovation 70% Information literacy 68% Quantitative reasoning 63% Integrative and Applied Learning Apply knowledge in real-world settings 79% Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities, 2010 (ISBN 978-0-911696-62-2)
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How will we accomplish this? Mondays and Wednesdays Lectures have been prepared to tie foundational concepts of biology to real-life application (see COURSE SCHEDULE) Some examples: How do pain killers work? What is cancer and how can sun tanning cause it? What are the major causes of the earth’s environmental problems? Why are doctors becoming increasingly hesitant to prescribe antibiotics? Students are responsible for defining a list of terms or phrases, and being familiar, in a scientific format, with the general application of those terms; terms then will be used in the M-W Discussions
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How will we accomplish this? (conti.) Friday Discussion Sessions Students discuss (room number is on Route Y), using the previously discussed biological content knowledge, a current biology-related issue Some examples:
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Gates during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Welcome Skepticism Fall Aug 29 2011 - Welcome to Biology...

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