Henry_VIII_and_his_court

Henry_VIII_and_his_court - Henry VII and his Court When...

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Henry VII and his Court When Henry VIII became king, he knew it was important to show himself as being powerful and a fierce ruler. In order to do this, Henry surrounded himself with as many people as possible and at Hampton Court Palace he was waited on by nearly 1000 servants. It was assumed that the more people you had in your court, the more powerful you were. Many of the men who worked in the court were the sons of other powerful men who knew that being near Henry they would learn the ways of a great leader. Henry was a fine sportsman, dancer, musician and military tactician and he expected those around him to be the same. The older members of the aristocracy were envious of the prowess of these young men and called them ‘Pretty Boys’. In Tudor times it was not unusual for Kings and Barons to battle for power and so Henry distanced himself from these men, building up his magnificence and making his position more secure. Controlling his power was quite a job and so he drew up a set of rules
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Henry_VIII_and_his_court - Henry VII and his Court When...

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