rationing_it_out

rationing_it_out - Rationing it out (1) Food rationing came...

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Rationing it out (1) Food rationing came into force in January 1940. At its worst, in 1942, a typical ration for one adult per week was: Butter: 50g (2oz) Bacon and ham: 100g (4oz) Margarine: 100g (4oz) Sugar: 225g (8oz). Meat: To the value of 1s.2d (one shilling and sixpence per week. That is about 6p today) Milk: 1800ml (3 pints) occasionally dropping to 1200ml (2 pints). Cheese: 50g (2oz) Eggs: 1 fresh egg a week. Tea: 50g (2oz). Jam: 450g (1lb) every two months. Dried eggs 1 packet every four weeks. Sweets: 350g (12oz) every four weeks Foods such as rice, jam, biscuits, tinned food and dried fruit were rationed by points. Each family had to register with a shop or store where the food would be bought and this was the only place where the family could shop. Each member of the family had his/her own ration book, adults had a buff coloured book, children over three had a blue book and babies had a green book. How much food would your family be able to buy each week?
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rationing_it_out - Rationing it out (1) Food rationing came...

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