BLOOD - BLOOD Red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes,...

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BLOOD Red blood cells , also known as erythrocytes , are flattened, doubly concave cells about 7 µm in diameter that carry oxygen associated in the cell's hemoglobin. Mature erythrocytes lack a nucleus. They are small, 4 to 6 million cells per cubic millimeter of blood, and have 200 million hemoglobin molecules per cell. Humans have a total of 25 trillion red blood cells (about 1/3 of all the cells in the body). Red blood cells are continuously manufactured in red marrow of long bones, ribs, skull, and vertebrae. Life-span of an erythrocyte is only 120 days, after which they are destroyed in liver and spleen. Iron from hemoglobin is recovered and reused by red marrow. The liver degrades the heme units and secretes them as pigment in the bile, responsible for the color of feces. Each second two million red blood cells are produced to replace those thus taken out of circulation. White blood cells , also known as leukocytes , are larger than erythrocytes, have a nucleus, and lack hemoglobin. They function in the cellular immune response. White
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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