Endergonic and exergonic

Endergonic and - is the gain of an electron Sometimes we also have H ions along for the ride so reduction also becomes the gain of H Oxidation is

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Endergonic and exergonic Energy releasing processes, ones that "generate" energy, are termed exergonic reactions. Reactions that require energy to initiate the reaction are known as endergonic reactions. All natural processes tend to proceed in such a direction that the disorder or randomness of the universe increases (the second law of thermodynamics ). Oxidation/Reduction Biochemical reactions in living organisms are essentially energy transfers. Often they occur together, "linked", in what are referred to as oxidation/reduction
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
reactions. Reduction
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: is the gain of an electron. Sometimes we also have H ions along for the ride, so reduction also becomes the gain of H. Oxidation is the loss of an electron (or hydrogen). In oxidation/reduction reactions, one chemical is oxidized, and its electrons are passed (like a hot potato) to another (reduced, then) chemical. Such coupled reactions are referred to as redox reactions. The metabolic processes glycolysis , Kreb's Cycle , and Electron Transport Phosphorylation involve the transfer of electrons (at varying energy states) by redox reactions....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Endergonic and - is the gain of an electron Sometimes we also have H ions along for the ride so reduction also becomes the gain of H Oxidation is

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online