Human Allelic Disorder2

Human Allelic Disorder2 - Phenylketonuria (PKU) is...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Allelic Disorders (Recessive) The first Mendelian trait in humans was described in 1905 (brachydactly) by Dr. Farabee (no relation to your author). Now more than 3500 human genetic traits are known. Albinism , the lack of pigmentation in skin, hair, and eyes, is also a Mendelian human trait. Homozygous recessive (aa) individuals make no pigments, and so have face, hair, and eyes that are white to yellow. For heterozygous parents with normal pigmentation (Aa), two different types of gametes may be produced: A or a. From such a cross 1/4 of the children could be albinos. The brown pigment melanin cannot be made by albinos. Several mutations may cause albinism: 1) the lack of one or another enzyme along the melanin-producing pathway; or 2) the inability of the enzyme to enter the pigment cells and convert the amino acid tyrosine into melanin.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Phenylketonuria (PKU) is recessively inherited disorder whose sufferers lack the ability to synthesize an enzyme to convert the amino acid phenylalanine into tyrosine Individuals homozygous recessive for this allele have a buildup of phenylalanine and abnormal breakdown products in the urine and blood. The breakdown products can be harmful to developing nervous systems and lead to mental retardation. 1 in 15,000 infants suffers from this problem. PKU homozygotes are now routinely tested for in most states. If you look closely at a product containing Nutra-sweet artificial sweetener, you will see a warning to PKU sufferers since phenylalanine is one of the amino acids in the sweetener. PKU sufferers are placed on a diet low in phenylalanine, enough for metabolic needs but not enough to cause the buildup of harmful intermediates....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online