Ray - much the way a ballast tank does on a submarine to control buoyancy Salmon trout and eels can migrate from fresh water to salt water but must

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Ray-finned Fish (Actinopterygii) The ray-finned fish include familiar species such as tuna, bass, perch, and trout. Ray- finned fish are the most successful and diverse of the vertebrates (more than half of all vertebrate species belong to this group). Thin, bony supports with radiating bones (hence the term ray-finned) hold the fins away from the body. Ray-finned fish obtain their food by filter feeding and by preying on insects and other animals. Their skin is covered by scales formed of bone. These scales are homologous to our own hair (and the feathers of birds), being derived from the same embryonic tissues. The gills in this group of fish do not open separately and are covered by an operculum. Ray-finned fish have a swim bladder, a gas-filled sac, that regulates buoyancy and depth. Sharks lack this feature, which enables fish to "sleep" without sinking. The swim bladder acts
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Unformatted text preview: much the way a ballast tank does on a submarine to control buoyancy. Salmon, trout, and eels can migrate from fresh water to salt water, but must adjust kidney and gill function to the tonicity of their environments. In freshwater, the fish is hyoptonic relative to its aqueous (watery) environment. Water is constantly flooding into the fish, and must be removed by the fish's excretory system . In seawater, the fish is now hypertonic or isotonic relative to the seawater, requiring conservation of body water. Bony fishes depend on color vision to detect both rivals and mates. Sperm and eggs are released into the water, with not much parental care for the newborn. Most fish have fertilization and embryonic development taking place outside the female's body....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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