The Archea - find too harsh. Three types of archaebacteria:...

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The Archea The most primitive group, the archaebacteria , are today restricted to marginal habitats such as hot springs or areas of low oxygen concentration. Archaebacteria (now more commonly referred to as the Archaea) are considered among the oldest and most primitive types of organisms known. They have significant differences in their cell walls and biochemistry when compared to the bacteria. These differences are sufficient in most schemes, to place the Archaea into a separate kingdom or domain. Under the three domain model, they are the taxonomic equivalents of the other bacteria and the eukaryotes. It is thought that since bacteria and Archaea inhabit some of the modern environments thought by paleontologists to resemble what the early Earth was like, that both are descended from a common ancestor. The Eukarya later split from the Archaea. The archeans are life's extremists, occupying environments that "normal" organisms
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Unformatted text preview: find too harsh. Three types of archaebacteria: methanogens, halophiles, and thermacidophiles. They live in extreme habitats. The methanogens are chemosynthetic archeans that produce methane (CH 4 ) from hydrogen gas and CO 2 . Both ATP synthesis and CO 2 reduction are linked to this reaction. Methanogens can decompose animal wastes to produce methane, which can be collected and combusted to make ecological friendly electricity. Pollutants from methane combustion are much fewer than from combustion of coal. There are three groups of Archaea. The methanogens live under anaerobic environments (e.g., marshes) where they produce methane. Halophiles require high salt concentrations (such as in Utah's Great Salt Lake). Thermoacidophiles live under hot, acidic environments (like those found in geysers)....
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