The Class Insecta

The Class Insecta - The Class Insecta Growth patterns are...

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The Class Insecta Growth patterns are quite variable. Some insects hatch from eggs as miniature adults, which in turn shed their exoskeleton. Most insect species have newly hatched young that are completely different in appearance from adults. These larval forms usually live in different habitats, eat different foods, and look completely different from their adult stages. When larval growth is completed, the larva stops feeding and builds a case or cocoon around itself. In this nonfeeding condition (pupa or chrysalis) the larva undergoes a complete transformation or "metamorphosis" of its body form, eventually emerging as a fully-formed adult. Insects are very valuable to us. While insects eat our food, feed on our blood and skin, contaminate our dwellings, and transmit diseases, we could not exist if thety were not here. Insects are a vital part of our ecosystem, functioning in: pollination of many flowering plants decomposition of organic materials recycling of carbon, nitrogen, and other essential nutrients
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The Class Insecta - The Class Insecta Growth patterns are...

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