The Eukaryotic Genome

The Eukaryotic Genome - The Eukaryotic Genome We use the...

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The Eukaryotic Genome We use the term genome to refer to all of the alleles possessed by an organism (or by a population, species, or larger taxonomic group). While the amount of DNA for a diploid cell is constant within a species, the differences can be great between species. Humans have 3.5 X 10 9 base pairs, Drosophila has 1.5 X 10 8 , toads have 3.32 X 10 9 , and salamanders have 8 X 10 10 base pairs per haploid genome. Much of the DNA in each cell either has no function or has a function not yet known. Eukaryotes have only 10% of their DNA coding for proteins. Humans may have a little as 1% coding for proteins. Viruses and prokaryotes use a great deal more of their DNA. Almost half the DNA in eukaryotic cells is repeated nucleotide sequences . Protein- coding sequences are interrupted by non-coding regions. Non-coding interruptions are known as intervening sequences or introns . Coding sequences that are expressed are exons .
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Most, but not all structural eukaryote genes contain introns. Although transcribed,
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The Eukaryotic Genome - The Eukaryotic Genome We use the...

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