The Forebrain - The Forebrain The forebrain consists of the...

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The Forebrain The forebrain consists of the diencephalon and cerebrum. The thalamus and hypothalamus are the parts of the diencephalon. The thalamus acts as a switching center for nerve messages. The hypothalamus is a major homeostatic center having both nervous and endocrine functions. The cerebrum, the largest part of the human brain, is divided into left and right hemispheres connected to each other by the corpus callosum. The hemispheres are covered by a thin layer of gray matter known as the cerebral cortex , the most recently evolved region of the vertebrate brain. Fish have no cerebral cortex, amphibians and reptiles have only rudiments of this area. The cortex in each hemisphere of the cerebrum is between 1 and 4 mm thick. Folds divide the cortex into four lobes: occipital , temporal , parietal , and frontal . No region of the brain functions alone, although major functions of various parts of the lobes have been determined. The occipital lobe (back of the head) receives and processes visual information. The temporal
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The Forebrain - The Forebrain The forebrain consists of the...

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