The Operon Model

The Operon Model - regulator does not have to be adjacent...

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The Operon Model The operon model of prokaryotic gene regulation was proposed by Fancois Jacob and Jacques Monod. Groups of genes coding for related proteins are arranged in units known as operons. An operon consists of an operator, promoter, regulator, and structural genes. The regulator gene codes for a repressor protein that binds to the operator, obstructing the promoter (thus, transcription) of the structural genes. The
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Unformatted text preview: regulator does not have to be adjacent to other genes in the operon. If the repressor protein is removed, transcription may occur. Operons are either inducible or repressible according to the control mechanism. Seventy-five different operons controlling 250 structural genes have been identified for E. coli . Both repression and induction are examples of negative control since the repressor proteins turn off transcription....
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The Operon Model - regulator does not have to be adjacent...

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