The Plant Life Cycle

The Plant Life Cycle - sporophyte phase is succeeded by the...

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The Plant Life Cycle Plants have an alternation of generations: the diploid spore-producing plant (sporophyte) alternates with the haploid gamete-producing plant (gametophyte), as shown in Figure 3. Animal life cycles have meiosis followed immediately by gametogenesis. Gametes are produced directly by meiosis. Male gametes are sperm. Female gametes are eggs or ova. The plant life cycle has mitosis occurring in spores , produced by meiosis, that germinate into the gametophyte phase. Gametophyte size ranges from three cells (in pollen ) to several million (in a "lower plant" such as moss). Alternation of generations occurs in plants, where the
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Unformatted text preview: sporophyte phase is succeeded by the gametophyte phase. The sporophyte phase produces spores by meiosis within a sporangium . The gametophyte phase produces gametes by mitosis within an antheridium (producing sperm) and/or archegonium (producing eggs). These different stages of the flowering plant life cycle are shown in Figure 4. Within the plant kingdom the dominance of phases varies. Nonvascular plants , the mosses and liverworts, have the gametophyte phase dominant. Vascular plants show a progression of increasing sporophyte dominance from the ferns and "fern allies" to angiosperms....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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