The Structure of DNA

The Structure of DNA - (ATP) before, although in that case...

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The Structure of DNA DNA is a double helix, with bases to the center (like rungs on a ladder) and sugar- phosphate units along the sides of the helix (like the sides of a twisted ladder). The strands are complementary (deduced by Watson and Crick from Chargaff's data, A pairs with T and C pairs with G, the pairs held together by hydrogen bonds ). Notice that a double-ringed purine is always bonded to a single ring pyrimidine. Purines are Adenine (A) and Guanine (G). We have encountered Adenosine triphosphate
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Unformatted text preview: (ATP) before, although in that case the sugar was ribose , whereas in DNA it is deoxyribose. Pyrimidines are Cytosine (C) and Thymine (T). The bases are complementary, with A on one side of the molecule you only get T on the other side, similarly with G and C. If we know the base sequence of one strand we know its complement. Rendering of two complementary bases on a DNA molecule. Image prepared using MacMolecule....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The Structure of DNA - (ATP) before, although in that case...

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