Vertebrate Cardiovascular Syste1

Vertebrate Cardiovascular Syste1 - microscopic in size,...

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Vertebrate Cardiovascular System Capillaries, shown in Figures 4 and 5, are thin-walled blood vessels in which gas exchange occurs. In the capillary, the wall is only one cell layer thick. Capillaries are concentrated into capillary beds . Some capillaries have small pores between the cells of the capillary wall, allowing materials to flow in and out of capillaries as well as the passage of white blood cells. Changes in blood pressure also occur in the various vessels of the circulatory system, as shown in Figure 6. Nutrients, wastes, and hormones are exchanged across the thin walls of capillaries. Capillaries are
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Unformatted text preview: microscopic in size, although blushing is one manifestation of blood flow into capillaries. Control of blood flow into capillary beds is done by nerve-controlled sphincters. The circulatory system functions in the delivery of oxygen, nutrient molecules, and hormones and the removal of carbon dioxide, ammonia and other metabolic wastes. Capillaries are the points of exchange between the blood and surrounding tissues. Materials cross in and out of the capillaries by passing through or between the cells that line the capillary, as shown in Figure 7....
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Vertebrate Cardiovascular Syste1 - microscopic in size,...

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