sas30 Lec8

sas30 Lec8 - Symbiosis = two species in a close...

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Symbiosis = two species in a close relationship Mutualism: both species benefit Commensalism: one species benefits, the other species is not affected Parasitism: one species benefits, the other species suffers
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Matching fanny packs
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39 species Central, North and South America
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Use powerful jaws to cut bits of leaf
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Considered an agricultural pest Some can defoliate an entire citrus tree in less than 24 hours
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The foraging line can stretch more than 250 meters from their nest
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They take the leafs back home They then chew them up But they don’t eat them…
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They use them to create compost This compost is used to cultivate fungi! The ants the eat the fungus. Fungi-based agriculture: fungiculture The white stuff is the fungi.
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The ants clean the leafs to prevent contamination They remove “weeds” They create the compost The ants infuse bits of fungus into the mix
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Bacteria Other fungi that compete with the one the ants eat
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If the fungus is removed from the nest, mold will grow, killing the fungus
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Ants have been using antibiotics for 50 million years! We’ve been using them since 1940s
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Ants eat the fungus Young eat only the fungus Adults also eat plant sap
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Colonies produce winged ants
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2011 for the course SAS 30 taught by Professor Wilhelm during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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sas30 Lec8 - Symbiosis = two species in a close...

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