Solomon Asch - Solomon E. Asch's "Opinions and Social...

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Solomon E. Asch's "Opinions and Social Pressure" ( Scientific American , Vol 193, No. 5, 1955) In the 1950s the social psychologist Solomon Asch conducted a famous experiment that highlighted the weakness of the person in a mass society when he is confronted with the differing opinion of a majority, and the tendency to conform even if this means to go against the person's basic perceptions. He demonstrated that naïve subjects could be induced to answer incorrectly by implicit social pressure. These are also known as the “Asch Paradigm”. The basic design of Asch’s study consisted of groups of seven to nine male college students seated in a classroom for a ‘psychological experiment in visual judgment’. The experimenter told them that they would be comparing the length of lines and he showed them two white cards below. The card on the left was the standard line to be judged and the card on the right shows the three comparison lines.
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Solomon Asch - Solomon E. Asch's "Opinions and Social...

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