friction

friction - • To take part in a range of activities to...

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Unformatted text preview: • To take part in a range of activities to explore the world around them, and ask questions and suggest answers (E) • Friction is a force between two surfaces that are sliding, or trying to slide across one another, for example when you try to push a toy car along the floor. • Friction always works in the direction opposite from the direction the object is moving, or trying to move. It always slows a moving object down. Moving Friction • The amount of friction depends on the materials from which the two surfaces are made. The rougher the surface, the more friction is produced. For example, you would have to push a book harder to get it moving on a carpet than you would on a wooden floor. This is because there is more friction between the carpet and the book than there is between the wood and the book. • Friction also produces heat. For example, if you rub your hands together quickly, they get warmer. •...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course PHYS 122 taught by Professor Terry during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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friction - • To take part in a range of activities to...

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